Tag Archives: GDP

Colorado Job Growth Holds Steady

In early March the Bureau of Labor Statistics released revised employment data for Colorado showing that 2014 was the 3rd strongest year of job growth in the state’s history and 2015 was ranked 9th.

Data released near the end of March shows that average year-over-year Colorado job growth for the past seven months has been about 67,000 jobs greater than the previous 12-month period. The reduced rate of expansion has occurred for the following reasons:
• The slowdown in the Chinese economy has caused many countries to experience lower rates of GDP growth.
• Colorado’s extractive industries are continuing to contract.
• Just as the Broncos can’t win the Super Bowl every year, it is not possible to have “Super-Bowl-like” job growth all the time.

Although the rate of growth for employment and the GDP are less than last year, the economy will still experience solid growth for the following reasons:
• There is solid GDP growth across most Colorado sectors.
• Job growth is stable in most industries and occupations.
• Solid and diverse growth will continue in the state’s personal income, population, and per capita personal income.
• There is a strong outlook for the construction industry in Colorado and the U.S.
• Robust new car sales are a reflection of solid personal consumption.
• There is increased activity at DIA and the area surrounding the airport.
• While low unemployment can be problematic it will drive higher wages.
• Higher wages will cause increased consumption and offset higher living costs.

Despite the headwinds, Colorado is on track for continued solid growth in 2016. For more details check out the most recent updates by clicking here or check out cber.co Colorado Economic 2016 Forecast.

Colorado Job Growth

Colorado Real GDP Currently Stronger than U.S.

On December 10th, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) released quarterly GDP data for Colorado (2005 to Q2 2015). The Q2 year-over-year Real GDP for Colorado increased by 4.8% compared to 2.7% for the U.S.

The following trends are evident in the comparison of the year-over-year GDP data for Colorado and the U.S:
• The correlation coefficient between these two variables is .69
• The U.S. was stronger during the period Q1 2006 through Q1 2007.
• Colorado outperformed the U.S. significantly between Q2 2007 and Q4 2009 (This was during the recession).
• The U.S. was stronger coming out of the recession for most of 2010 – from Q1 2010 to Q3 2010.
• For the next two years, from Q4 2010 to Q3 2012 the rates of growth for Colorado and the U.S. were similar.
• From Q4 2012 to the present, the Colorado GDP expanded at a faster rate than the U.S. GDP. Beginning in Q1 2014 the gap between the two rates became greater as a result of the strength of the oil and gas industry in Colorado.
• That gap has since narrowed in 2015 as the price of oil has declined and oil and gas production has fallen off.

Colorado Real GDP

 

The following trends are evident in the comparison of the year-over-year GDP data for Colorado and the Colorado wage and salary employment:
• The correlation coefficient between these two variables is .72
• Employment grew at a higher rate from Q1 2006 to Q2 2007 than the Real GDP.
• Generally, the Real GDP grew at a greater rate from Q3 2007 to Q2 2011 than employment growth.
• From Q3 2011 to Q1 2014 the rate of growth for employment was generally greater than the Real GDP growth.
• From Q2 2014 to present the Real GDP grew at a greater rate than employment. This was in part largely because of the increase in oil and gas production in Colorado during this period.
• As the price for a barrel has dropped and oil and gas production has fallen off the gap between the two rates has declined. This caused a much greater decline in the growth rate for GDP than employment.

Colorado Real GDP

As can be seen the growth of the Colorado Real GDP and the U.S. Real GDP are closely related. As well, there is a strong relationship between the rate of growth for state Real GDP and employment.

Colorado Economy On Track to Add At Least 68,600 Jobs in 2015

At the midpoint of the year the U.S. economy is on solid footing and the second half of the year will be much stronger than the first half. The Colorado economy continues to outperform the U.S. in its rate of growth for population, employment, and GDP.

Key Data Points for the U.S.
Real GDP – Q2 will be stronger. Annual growth will be 2.5% to 2.9% in 2015.
Retail Sales – Up 1.3% for 6 months, projected to be up 3.0% for 2015.
U.S. Employment – The U.S. is on track to add 3.1 million jobs this year.
Unemployment Rate – 5.3%, down from 6.1% a year ago, 8.3 million unemployed, trending down.
ISM Indices –Manufacturing is sluggish and expected to remain that way; Non-Manufacturing is steady and well above 50.
Price of a Barrel of Oil (WTI) – Since mid-March it has varied from $43 to $61. Currently in the low 50s, but trending down.
Construction – For 6 months, employment up 4.2%, weekly earnings up 3.0%.
Case Shiller Housing Prices – U.S. prices up 4.2% from a year ago.
Dow Jones Industrial Average – On July 17rd the DJIA was 18,086, up 1.5% from 17,823 at the end of the year.

Average Colorado employment is 68,600 greater than the same period last year, with the potential of being revised upward at a later date.

Colorado Economy

As has been the case in the past, the sectors with the top job growth are: Health Care; Accommodations and Food Services (part of the Tourism Industry); Construction; Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services; and Manufacturing. These sectors accounted for about 72% of total job growth in the first half of 2015.

The Bureau of Economic Analysis has released the 2014 Gross Domestic Product for Colorado. The state’s Real GDP expanded at a rate of 4.7% compared to 2.2% for the U.S.

Key Data Points for Colorado
QCEW Revisions – Recent revisions to Q4 2014 could cause 2014 employment to be revised upward in the March 2016 benchmark revisions. There was stronger momentum coming into 2015 than originally anticipated.
Population – Colorado’s population will increase by 88,800 people this year.
Unemployment Rate – 4.4%, down from 5.0% a year ago.
MSA Unemployment Rate – Boulder and Ft. Collins have the lowest rates at 3.5% and 3.6% respectively.
2014 Colorado GDP – The state Real GDP grew by 4.7% in 2014 compared to 2.2% for the U.S.
2014 Contribution to GDP Growth – The Mining sector accounted for 6.2% of GDP and 18.2% of GDP growth in 2014.
Wage and Salary Employment – On average Colorado has added 68,600 jobs this year based on current data. This is not adjusted for the projected revisions.
Leading Sectors for Growth – About 72.2% of the jobs have been added in the Health Care; Construction; Accommodations and Food Services; Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services; and Manufacturing.

For details or more information about the Colorado economy, check out the 2015 cber.co forecast and economic updates on this website, https://cber.co.

Advanced Technology Cluster Contributes 17.8% to GDP Growth

In early June the Bureau of Economic Analysis released Gross Domestic Product at the state level for two-digit NAICS Codes.

Since 1997 Colorado Real GDP has grown at a faster rate than the Real GDP for the U.S. (Sum of States) in 11 of 17 years. The 2014 U.S. rate of growth was 2.2% compared to 4.7% for Colorado.

Since 1997 Colorado Real GDP has grown at a faster rate than the U.S. (Sum of States), 2.8% vs. 2.1%.

There were 12 sectors that lost share in 2014, i.e. their percent of contribution for these sectors was less than their percent of the 2014 total. Collectively, they accounted for 72.9% of the 2014 GDP and 53.5% of the change in the GDP. It was disappointing that the proxy for Colorado’s advanced technology cluster only contributed 17.8% to state’s GDP.

The following table shows the sectors, their percentage of the 2014 GDP and their contribution to the GDP.

Sector % of 2014 Total % of 2014 Contribution
Educational services 0.7% 0.6%
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting 1.1% 0.3%
Other services, except government 2.3% 1.8%
Administrative and waste management services 3.0% 2.9%
Retail trade 5.4% 3.9%
Finance and insurance 5.6% 3.1%
Health care and social assistance 6.0% 5.8%
Manufacturing 7.1% 6.8%
Information 7.2% 2.9%
Professional, scientific, and technical services 8.9% 8.1%
Government 12.1% 4.8%
Real estate and rental and leasing 13.5% 12.4%

There are concerns regarding the level of contribution for the five sectors that have the greatest share of the state’s GDP. The top sectors are:
• Real Estate 13.5%
• Government 12.1%
• Professional, scientific, and technical services, 8.9%
• Information 7.2%
• Manufacturing 7.1%
These five sectors accounted for 48.8% of the 2014 GDP; however they only contributed 35.0% of the 2014 GDP growth.

Of specific concern is the fact that PST, Information, and Manufacturing accounted for 23.2% of the state’s 2014 GDP, yet these 3 sectors only contributed 17.8% of the growth of the GDP. These three sectors are a proxy for the state’s advanced technology cluster, a cluster that is supposed to provide the state with a competitive advantage.

Despite these concerns, the level of Real GDP Growth in 2014 provided significant momentum for the Colorado economy moving into 2015.

GDP losing share - Advanced Technology Cluster

2014 Colorado Real GDP Growth More than Twice the Rate for U.S.

In early June the Bureau of Economic Analysis released Gross Domestic Product at the state level for two-digit NAICS Codes.

Since 1997 Colorado Real GDP has grown at a faster rate than the Real GDP for the U.S. (Sum of States) in 11 of 17 years.

gdp index

Since 1997 Colorado Real GDP has grown at a faster rate than the U.S. (Sum of States), 2.8% vs. 2.1%. The 2014 U.S. rate of growth was 2.2% compared to 4.7% for Colorado.

gdp index

There were 8 sectors that gained share in 2014, i.e., their percent of contribution to GDP was greater than their percent of the 2014 total GDP. Collectively, they accounted for 27.1% of the 2014 GDP and 46.5% of the change in the GDP. These sectors were:
• Arts, entertainment, and recreation
• Utilities
• Management of companies and enterprises
• Transportation and warehousing
• Accommodation and food services
• Construction
• Wholesale trade
• Mining

There were 12 sectors that lost share in 2014, i.e. their percent of contribution for these sectors was less than their percent of the 2014 total. Collectively, they accounted for 72.9% of the 2014 GDP and 53.5% of the change in the GDP. These sectors were:
• Educational services
• Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting
• Other services, except government
• Administrative and waste management services
• Retail trade
• Finance and insurance
• Health care and social assistance
• Manufacturing
• Information
• Professional, scientific, and technical services
• Government
• Real estate and rental and leasing

The level of Real GDP Growth in 2014 provided significant momentum for the Colorado economy moving into 2015.

Mining and Real Estate – Drivers of the Colorado Economy

Thank goodness for the  mining and real estate industries! From an output perspective these industries are the primary drivers of the Colorado economy.

In 2013, Colorado’s nominal GDP was $294.4 billion (most current data available). The state’s economy expanded by $157.1 billion between 1997 and 2013 (1997 is the first year that data was available). Between 2009 and 2013 the GDP expanded by $46.3 billion.

The Great Recession had a major impact on the way the economy expanded. This is evident when comparing the contribution to output for the periods 1997 to 2013 and 2009 to 2013.

Between 1997 and 2013 the contribution to GDP was broken down as follows:
• Goods Producing 20.5%
• Service Producing 68.6%
• Private sector (Goods + Services) 89.0%
• Government 11.0%

Between 1997 and 2013 the annualized rate of growth for the GDP follows:
• Total 4.9%
• Private 5.0%
• Government 4.1%

Between 2009 and 2013 the contribution to GDP was broken down as follows:
• Goods Producing 28.0%
• Service Producing 65.5%
• Private sector (Goods + Service) 93.6%
• Government 6.4%

Between 2009 and 2013 the annualized rate of growth for the GDP follows:
• Total 4.4%
• Private 4.7%
• Government 2.2%

Thank goodness for the Goods Producing Sectors (Agriculture, Mining, Construction, and Manufacturing)!

Industry 2013 GDP (millions) 2013 minus 1997 % of Total 2013 minus 2009 % of Total
All industry total $294,443 $157,072 $46,266
Private industries $258,217 $139,860 89.0% $43,287 93.6%
Goods Producing $57,447 $32,144 20.5% $12,964 28.0%
Service Producing $200,771 $107,718 68.6% $30,325 65.5%
Government $36,226 $17,212 11.0% $2,979 6.4%

The following two tables provide more detail by industry.

The following table shows more detail by industry sector. It is sorted in descending order by the column 2013 minus 1997.

Industry 2013 GDP (millions) 2013 minus 1997 % of Total 2013 minus 2009 % of Total
Real estate and rental and leasing $40,194 $21,355 13.6% $6,895 14.9%
Mining $19,848 $17,964 11.4% $8,518 18.4%
Government $36,226 $17,212 11.0% $2,979 6.4%
Professional, scientific, and technical services $26,355 $16,084 10.2% $4,233 9.1%
Information $21,578 $12,019 7.7% $1,407 3.0%
Health care and social assistance $17,438 $10,503 6.7% $2,262 4.9%
Wholesale trade $15,915 $7,818 5.0% $2,606 5.6%
Retail trade $16,105 $6,926 4.4% $1,965 4.2%
Manufacturing $21,600 $6,657 4.2% $2,171 4.7%
Finance and insurance $14,480 $6,067 3.9% $2,436 5.3%
Accommodation and food services $9,409 $5,255 3.3% $1,769 3.8%
Management of companies and enterprises $6,207 $5,106 3.3% $1,550 3.4%
Construction $11,820 $4,861 3.1% $208 0.4%
Administrative and waste management $8,653 $4,308 2.7% $1,090 2.4%
Transportation and warehousing $7,984 $4,094 2.6% $1,598 3.5%
Other services $6,549 $2,784 1.8% $605 1.3%
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting $4,179 $2,662 1.7% $2,067 4.5%
Arts, entertainment, and recreation $3,848 $2,029 1.3% $890 1.9%
Utilities $3,798 $1,782 1.1% $646 1.4%
Educational services $2,258 $1,588 1.0% $373 0.8%

The following table shows more detail by industry sector. It is sorted in descending order by the column 2013 minus 2009.

Industry 2013 GDP (millions) 2013 minus 1997 % of Total 2013 minus 2009 % of Total
Mining $19,848 $17,964 11.4% $8,518 18.4%
Real estate and rental and leasing $40,194 $21,355 13.6% $6,895 14.9%
Professional, scientific, and technical services $26,355 $16,084 10.2% $4,233 9.1%
Government $36,226 $17,212 11.0% $2,979 6.4%
Wholesale trade $15,915 $7,818 5.0% $2,606 5.6%
Finance and insurance $14,480 $6,067 3.9% $2,436 5.3%
Health care and social assistance $17,438 $10,503 6.7% $2,262 4.9%
Manufacturing $21,600 $6,657 4.2% $2,171 4.7%
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting $4,179 $2,662 1.7% $2,067 4.5%
Retail trade $16,105 $6,926 4.4% $1,965 4.2%
Accommodation and food services $9,409 $5,255 3.3% $1,769 3.8%
Transportation and warehousing $7,984 $4,094 2.6% $1,598 3.5%
Management of companies and enterprises $6,207 $5,106 3.3% $1,550 3.4%
Information $21,578 $12,019 7.7% $1,407 3.0%
Administrative and waste management $8,653 $4,308 2.7% $1,090 2.4%
Arts, entertainment, and recreation $3,848 $2,029 1.3% $890 1.9%
Utilities $3,798 $1,782 1.1% $646 1.4%
Other services $6,549 $2,784 1.8% $605 1.3%
Educational services $2,258 $1,588 1.0% $373 0.8%
Construction $11,820 $4,861 3.1% $208 0.4%

 

U.S. and Colorado Economy Remain Solid

National Economy
The U.S. economy remains strong, with solid employment and output growth.

• Nationally, employment remains strong, despite slower than expected job growth in August. The non-seasonally adjusted data shows that an average of 215,000 jobs has been added each month through eight months. This means the U.S. will add about 2.5 million jobs this year.
• Output remains solid. The first Q2 estimate showed real GDP growth of 4.0%. That was revised upwards to 4.2%. It is possible the third estimate, due later this month, could be revised even higher to 5.0%.
• At the most recent FOMC meeting the Federal Reserve provided no surprises. Their stance on the economy indicates:
o The rate of inflation remains below target.
o Quantitative easing will come to an end.
o There is slack in the labor market.
o Interest rates will remain low in the near term; however, once rate increases begin they will accelerate faster than previously anticipated. It is likely rates will begin increasing in mid-2015.
• The outlook for construction is positive.  Single family building permits have been flat; however the NAHB index shows that homebuilder sentiment is much stronger than the permits data. This suggests greater activity, and stronger data, will occur in the future.
• The unemployment rate, number of unemployed, and the number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits continue on a downward trend. The economy should remain healthy as long as fewer people are unemployed and an increasing number of Americans are working.

Colorado Economy

The performance of the Colorado economy is closely tied to changes in U.S. job and output growth. Since the end of the recession Colorado job growth has outperformed the U.S. because of its mix of industries. The state is on track to add jobs at an accelerated rate for the fourth consecutive year.  Job growth this year will be about 3.0%.

• The extractive industries have been a major direct and indirect contributor to the job growth. As well, the extractive industries were responsible for about one-third of the state’s GDP growth in 2013. The extractive industries are important to the economies of about half the counties in the state. From a jobs perspective, the sector is small, but the number of workers will increase by at least 9% this year compared to 2013.
• So far this year, between 10% and 12% of the jobs added in Colorado are construction jobs. The number of jobs will increase by at least 6.5% compared to the same period last year. Growth in the sector might be constrained by a lack of trained workers in specialized construction occupations such as plumbers, HVAC workers, and electricians. The home and infrastructure subsectors also include distinct specialized occupations.
• Tourism has enjoyed a banner year in Colorado. It began with good snow and a strong ski season. The good snow season also meant plenty of water for mountain rafting and summer tourism activities. Special events, such as the USA Pro Challenge, and the lack of fires and flooding provided the foundation for a strong summer season. Leisure and hospitality job growth is poised to be at least 4.6% greater in 2014 than last year. The sector will be responsible for adding about 19% of the jobs in the state this year.  The sector plays a significant part of the economy in all 64 counties.
• The healthcare sector will add more than 10,000 workers in 2014 and expand at a rate of more than 4.3%. The sector continues to face challenges finding workers in many occupations and in rural areas.
• The growth of the professional, scientific, and technical sector is important to the state because a portion of these companies are directly or indirectly a part of the state’s advanced technology sector. The lifestyle of Downtown Denver and Colorado is attracting millennials to jobs in these sectors. The growth of in the sector will be at a rate of about 4.5% in 2014. It is important to note that many of these occupations pay higher than average wages and the sector is adding jobs at an increasing rate.