Throughout the year cber.co produces four types of research that measure the performance of the state economy;

  • Economic forecast of Colorado.  Click here for the 2018 forecast or click here for an abbreviated version of the 2018 forecast.
  • Periodic economic updates throughout the year.
  • Special reports on key topics.
  • Weekly blog posts.

This research shows where the state economy has been and where it is headed in the near-term and the factors that have caused it to change.

Colorado Economic Forecast 2018
Watch for the following in 2018….

  • Colorado will benefit from stable global and U.S. real GDP growth.
  • Net migration will be comparable to the last two years.
  • The Colorado inflation rate will increase; it will be about a point greater than the U.S. rate.
  • The Colorado economy is not operating efficiently because the unemployment rate is too low.
  • Colorado job growth will be slightly less than 2017.
  • The Colorado real GDP growth rate will be greater than the U.S. rate and will be driven by health care, real estate, and the extractive industries.
  • The state’s economic growth would be slowed if the Fed Funds rate is increased 3 times in 2018.
  • Manufacturing growth will be driven by a handful of larger companies.
  • Retail trade is evolving. Retail sales will remain strong.
    The 2018 legislative session will be dicey as legislators struggle to address social issues, congestion, transportation issues, the state pension fund, and how much funding should be allocated to education.
  • The state’s information sector is quietly evolving; there will be minimal job growth, but high value added.
  • The growth of the state will be constrained by the lack of workers to complete construction projects .
  • There are three economies in Colorado – Front Range, micropolitan areas such as Durango, and rural Colorado. It is an understatement to say that many rural counties are significantly challenged.
  • Amazing things are happening at DIA and the area surrounding it – Welcome Gaylord!
  • The lack of snow in December and early January has left its mark on the state’s ski areas. It would be worse if they had not invested in snowmaking.




Tracking the Colorado economy is like skiing. At times the skiing is good. Other times it is tenuous or too fast. Sometimes you crash or go backwards. In time you get headed in the right direction again.